Bartels Heating & Cooling Blog : Posts Tagged ‘Hamilton’

You May Need to Schedule AC Service Sooner than You Think

Monday, March 14th, 2016

Temperatures are on the rise, though they may seem pretty mild right now (except for quite a bit of rainfall lately). And since outdoor temperatures are perfectly fine right now, few people think about what will happen once temperatures heat up and their old air conditioning systems are back in action.

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Replace Your Heating System before the End of the Season

Monday, March 7th, 2016

If your heating system is reaching its breaking point, there’s no time to wait. Whether the heating season is nearly at its end or there are a few weeks left of cool weather, you deserve a new, high-performance, more efficient heater for this season and for all the years to come. And the best time to replace a struggling heater? Right now!

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Upgrades Available with New Furnaces that You Might Not Know about

Monday, February 1st, 2016

You might assume that all furnaces are fairly similar. But year after year, new advancements in technology make some furnaces more effective and efficient than others. And with optional upgrades like smart thermostats and zone control available, there’s no better time to get a new whole-home heater for a new home, or if an old system needs replace-ment.

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The Key to Quality Furnace Installation

Wednesday, March 25th, 2015

If you need a new furnace, it can be tough to pick someone for the job. You want to make sure that your new heating system runs properly, and you also want a technician who will treat your home with respect. Sometimes, homeowners resort to allowing a friend or family member with limited HVAC knowledge to install the new unit as this is someone they feel they can trust. However, if you don’t choose an experienced professional for furnace installation, it may end up costing you far more than you expect.

Here’s what you should know: the only way to ensure quality heating installation is by choosing an expert for the job. The highly qualified technicians at Bartels Heating & Cooling will make sure that your new heating system runs as efficiently as possible.

What Can Go Wrong with an Amateur Installation

There are a lot of things that may go wrong if you choose an amateur for heating installation. For one, you may end up with a unit at is not the proper size. This is a big deal because a furnace that is too large will use a lot of energy and may short cycle. A furnace that is too small will not heat the home completely and may expire sooner than it should.

Furthermore, there are a lot of risks when you’re working with a gas furnace. If the unit is not set up just right, you could risk a natural gas leak. Setting up the ventilation system or making sure that your existing flue pipe is compatible with the furnace is also important in preventing CO leaks. You don’t want to leave this job to someone without experience. Every component must be just right in order for it to work properly, which is why you should hire an expert for any heating installation job.

Furnace installation involves intensive knowledge of heating systems, which our technicians already have. Put your trust in the highly qualified, skilled people at Bartels Heating & Cooling as we take pride in our work and have provided quality furnace installation in Hamilton and the surrounding area. Call us today!

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Hamilton Water Heater Repair Guide: The Dip Tube

Wednesday, March 4th, 2015

You rely on your water heater for many of the most important activities you do during the day for your health and comfort. You use hot water to shower, wash your face, clean your home, and prepare meals. If your water heater is not keeping your water as warm as you would like it to, repairs can seem urgent. But you may delay water heater repair out of fear that the water heater may need replacement.

Actually, one of the most common repair needs for water heater that is a fairly simple fix for a trained contractor is a broken dip tube. The dip tube is a long plastic pipe that lets cold water in to the bottom of the unit. There is a burner or electric heating element located toward the bottom of the tank. Once the water heats up, it rises up to the top of the tank. Then, a small tube at the top of the tank allows the warm water to exit. The dip tube can fall into a state of disrepair, but a trained technician may be able to solve the trouble quickly.

There are a few things that could go wrong with the dip tube over time. It may develop small cracks that allow cold water to seep into the tank, lingering at the top. This means that you may notice bouts of cold or lukewarm water from your sink or shower rather than an uninterrupted stream of hot water. The dip tube may even simply break in half. When this happens, you might run out of hot water far too quickly.

This shouldn’t be a problem you have to live with. Call a technician for repairs as soon as you suspect a problem. And be sure to schedule annual water heater maintenance as well. This involves a few key adjustments to the system as well as a thorough examination of your entire unit to make sue something like a broken dip tube doesn’t go undetected for too long.

Count on the people at Bartels Heating & Cooling for quality water heaters and services in Hamilton. We pride ourselves on quality customer service and strive to keep your experience as positive as possible.

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Noises You Shouldn’t Hear from Your Boiler

Wednesday, February 4th, 2015

Boilers are some of the sturdiest and reliable home heating systems on the market today. They have fewer moving parts than most systems, which means fewer chances to have a breakdown. However, boiler systems are not invulnerable. There are a few problems that can arise with boilers of which you should definitely be aware. Most of those problems begin with unusual noises coming from the boiler itself. Let’s examine some of the noises that you really don’t want to hear from your boiler, and what you should do if you do hear them.

Rumbling

A rumbling noise coming from your boiler is a sign that it is kettling. Kettling is a serious issue that is caused by mineral deposits building up on the inside of the boiler’s heat exchanger. These mineral deposits are caused by hard water (water with a high mineral content) running through the boiler over a period of years. As the water runs through the heat exchanger, it deposits small amounts of minerals on the walls of the pipe. Eventually, these mineral deposits build up enough to restrict or block the flow of water through the heat exchanger. This causes the water to evaporate in the pipe, creating steam and putting immense pressure on the heat exchanger. This is what causes the rumbling sound you hear when a boiler is kettling. If you hear this sound, you should shut your boiler down right away and call a professional to fix it.

Gurgling

A gurgling sound is often heard in the pipes that are connected to the boiler, and run throughout the house. Gurgling is often accompanied by uneven heating, or even no heating at all depending on the layout of your heating system. It is caused by air bubbles in the pipes, which impede the flow of water and lessen the system’s ability to heat. The way to solve this problem is to drain all the air out of the system, which is best done by a qualified HVAC technician. Once the whole system is purged, the gurgling should stop.

If you are hearing strange noises from your boiler, make an appointment with us by calling Bartels Heating & Cooling. We provide quality boiler repair in the Hamilton, OH area.

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Can a Furnace Be Damaged by Clogged Filters?

Tuesday, January 13th, 2015

You may know that the filter(s) used along with your HVAC equipment help to eliminate contaminants from the air that you breathe. Forced-air systems would recirculate dirty air if there was not a barrier set in place, but a furnace filter can trap particles like dust and bacteria so that you can feel a little better about the indoor air quality.

If you wait to change a dirty filter for too long, it may affect the quality of the air. But more likely, you’ll notice the effects on your heating system first. A dirty furnace filter restricts airflow to the furnace, leading to higher energy spending, poor heating performance, and even a potential heating breakdown.

Your furnace requires a certain amount of airflow in order to operate properly. When your unit was first installed, technicians made precise measurements to make sure that the heating capacity of the furnace was enough to heat the home completely without using excessive amounts of energy. When not enough airflow can make its way into the furnace to be heated, the unit will consume too much energy in an attempt to get your home to the desired temperature.

But the high energy spending is not necessarily the biggest problem you may face. If your furnace takes longer to meet heating demands, parts can begin to become overworked. Your furnace may break down well before its expected lifespan and you’ll probably notice reduced heating in one or more areas of the house.

If your heating system is already struggling to heat your home, changing the filter may not be enough. While it is possible that the clogged filter contributed to the problems with your HVAC system, it’s also likely that the other parts have begun to break down as well and will require professional service.

Changing the filters every one to three months is a job you can do on your own, but heating repair is best left to professionals. You can also ensure your unit is working properly by scheduling maintenance annually and calling for repairs at the first sign of trouble. We offer professional heating services in the Hamilton area. Call Bartels Heating & Cooling today to schedule an appointment with us.

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How Can a Humidifier Keep You Comfortable and Healthy?

Sunday, January 4th, 2015

In the summer, you often hear people complain about the relative humidity. The amount of moisture in the air can have a major impact on how comfortable you feel, and this impact is probably most noticeable when humidity levels are high and you feel hot and sticky.

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How a Furnace Limit Switch Helps Keep You Safe

Wednesday, December 10th, 2014

Your furnace is manufactured with a number of safety mechanisms to help keep you, your home and your heating system safe. One of these safety mechanisms is the limit switch. The limit switch is part of your blower assembly, but is also part of your overall control system. This is why, should a problem develop with your limit switch, your furnace may experience operational issues. To understand more about the limit switch on your furnace in Hamilton, it’s important to learn what it is and how it works.

What Does a Limit Switch Do?

The limit switch is a device that has two functions: first, it won’t allow the fan to turn on until the air generated inside your furnace is warm enough and second, it acts as a kill switch to the burner should the air temperature around the heat exchanger become too hot. The reason the limit switch can turn off the burner is that when the temperature around the heat exchanger becomes too high, the heat exchanger can crack, allowing the toxic byproducts of combustion into your home.

Common Problems with Limit Switches

Like other components in your heating system, the limit switch can malfunction. The most common sign of a malfunctioning limit switch is the continuous operation of your furnace’s blower. Just as the limit switch won’t allow the fan to turn on until the warm air has reached the right temperature, the limit switch also shuts down when the air cools to a certain temperature. However, when a limit switch starts to go bad, it may not turn off at the end of a cycle; the result is a continuously-running blower.

A second problem is common with a limit switch is that won’t allow the furnace to operate. For example, if the air flow in your system is significantly reduced by a clogged air filter, there won’t be enough air circulating through the system; this can cause the heat exchanger to get too hot. Once the limit switch senses this, it turns off the burner.

It is very important that all the safety mechanisms on your furnace in Hamilton work correctly in order to keep you, your family and your home safe. If you suspect your limit switch may be experiencing problems, call Bartels Heating & Cooling today and schedule an appointment with one of our professional furnace repair and maintenance experts.

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Combustion Furnace Components: Electronic Igniters

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2014

Furnaces have a process by which they ignite; this ensures safety and correct combustion. Older furnaces have a standing pilot light, but today’s furnaces come equipped with an electronic igniter. There are two types of electronic igniters and each works a little differently, as we’ll explain below. If you are experiencing problems getting your furnace to ignite or stay lit after ignition, schedule an appointment with your Bartels Heating & Cooling specialist today for quality furnace services in Hamilton.

Types of Electronic Ignition

The two types of electronic ignition are:

  • Hot Surface Ignition
  • Intermittent Ignition

Hot Surface Ignition

A hot surface igniter is a metal probe that heats up when the thermostat cues the ignition process. When the igniter becomes hot enough (it will glow like a light bulb), the main gas valve opens, allowing the gas to flow. Once the gas comes into contact with the heat from the igniter, the gas ignites and lights the burner.

The most common problem that develops with a hot surface igniter is cracking. The metal heats and cools constantly, causing the metal to expand and contract; eventually, the metal will wear and crack. A cracked igniter can’t heat up properly, so your system will have trouble igniting.

Intermittent Ignition

With an intermittent igniter, gas flows through a small pilot line when the thermostat cues for ignition to begin. Once the gas flows, a small electronic device creates a spark that lights the pilot. A flame sensor checks to see if the pilot is lit and if the flame is viable; once the flame is found to be viable, the main gas valve opens and the pilot lights the burner.

A few things can cause the intermittent ignition to fail: incorrect positioning of the pilot gas pipe, problems with the electrical supply, and issues with the flame sensor.

Why Electronic Igniters?

With a standing pilot light, a small amount of gas has to flow all the time; this is not the case with either type of electronic igniter. This not only saves you energy, it can also be safer.

Ignition problems with your furnace in Hamilton should always be handled by an expert. Having ignition problems with your furnace? Contact us today!

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